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  • #1211
    LogicalHarm
    LogicalHarm
    Moderator

    Come on kids, fuck that class and hit that bong

     

    #1215
    Jimbo
    Jimbo
    Participant

    ^^ I want the 1 minute of my life that I spent on that song back.  YOU OFFICIALLY OWE ME LH!

    #1218
    LogicalHarm
    LogicalHarm
    Moderator

    You know I haven’t even listened to it myself. ROLFLULZ.

    I’ll buy you a candy bar when I see you 🙂

    #2079
    biomekanik
    biomekanik
    Participant

    Last book i read, was The Third Reich by Richard Avery. Inspired me to go to Krakow this year to see Auschwitz/Oswiciem

    #2535
    AJK
    AJK
    Participant

    In the past few weeks i’ve read 1Q84 and A Wild Sheep Chase, both by Haruki Murakami,.  Loved them, and would definitely recommend either and anything else by him, really.

    Just started Anthills of the Savannah by Chinua Achebe after hearing about his passing, fairly slow start but start but i’m excited for when it gets going (as i’m guessing it should).

    #2536
    AJK
    AJK
    Participant

    In the past few weeks i’ve read 1Q84 and A Wild Sheep Chase, both by Haruki Murakami.  Loved them, and would definitely recommend either and anything else by him, really.

    Just started Anthills of the Savannah by Chinua Achebe after hearing about his passing, fairly slow start but start but i’m excited for when it gets going (as i’m guessing it should).

    #8928

    Rosemary
    Participant
    #13405

    Rosemary
    Participant

    I just had to repost this because of the name of the bookstore. From Shelf Awareness:

    n 1942, Socorro Ramos and her husband, Jose, opened a small bookstall in an old section of downtown Manila. “Who opens a bookstore during a war?” asked Mitch Albom in a Detroit Free Press profile of the 90-year-old bookseller whose “fierce dedication to the book business is reflective of an attitude in the Philippines that writers so appreciate: a deep love of stories and words. The literacy rate here is over 95%, despite roughly a quarter of the population living below the poverty line.”

    After their street was nearly destroyed by fire in 1945, they opened another bookstall, Albom wrote. Three years later, a typhoon destroyed that structure and all the merchandise, so they rebuilt once again and “threw all their time and money into a new building, She called it the National Book Store because, she says, ‘I saw the name on the cash register, “National,” and I thought, ‘That is nice.’ ”

    The National Book Store is now the largest book and stationery chain in the Philippines and Ramos “still runs the show, coming into the office every day,” Albom wrote.

    “She still signs all the checks,” said her grandson Miguel, who is the company’s marketing director. “She still makes the big decisions. And if she wants something, it doesn’t matter what anyone says–not the board, not anybody–she gets it.”

    #13412
    LogicalHarm
    LogicalHarm
    Moderator

    Off note: They have such cute bags there! I wish I bought one. There were people at the show in the Phillipines with the bags.

    #14311

    Rosemary
    Participant

    I think there’s a thread somewhere about the rerelease of How Evan Broke His Head by Garth Stein, which includes an interview with the author by Bryan Devendorf, who acquired the book for Soho Press when he worked there. Based on that, I got an advance reader copy of A Sudden Light by Garth Stein, which comes out September 30 in the US. It is absolutely fantastic. My review, in part: Teenage angst, broken family, strange, long-lost relatives, spooky old house, hidden diaries, dynastic secrets, in a story that’s part The Perks of Being a Wallflower and part Shirley Jackson.

    #14318
    armsaroundthestereo
    armsaroundthestereo
    Participant

    I forgot there was a book thread!
    Anyway, I’ve been tearing through books these last few weeks. So far I have read:
    Bill Bryson’s A Walk In The Woods and Notes From A Small Island (currently about to finish In A Sunburned Country).
    Plus Neil Gaiman’s American Gods (first Gaiman book I’ve read and I finished it quickly in about a week).
    I’m torn on what to read next. Suggestions?

    #14525

    Rosemary
    Participant

    ^ Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman is absolutely his finest work.

    #14806
    Jimbo
    Jimbo
    Participant

    I’ve been reading “The Sparrow” by Mary Doria Russell.

    It’s a pretty good story of the human race’s first contact with extraterrestrials and how it effects the spirituality of the primarily Christian party who contacts them. The story is well written and it introduces some pretty good “discussion” on the nature of religion / spirituality and how it is practiced.

    #14897

    Rosemary
    Participant

    Jimbo wrote:I’ve been reading “The Sparrow” by Mary Doria Russell.

    It’s a pretty good story of the human race’s first contact with extraterrestrials and how it effects the spirituality of the primarily Christian party who contacts them. The story is well written and it introduces some pretty good “discussion” on the nature of religion / spirituality and how it is practiced.

    I was fortunate enough to see her at a book conference a few years ago (shortly before her book Doc came out, a novel about Doc Holliday – very good, by the way) and she was hilarious. She described going around after The Sparrow came out and telling people, “I just had a book published!” and then they would ask what it was about and she would say, “It’s about Jesuits in space!”

    #14902
    Jimbo
    Jimbo
    Participant

    That is cool. Did you ever read the follow up book? Personally I can’t see why else needs to be said from the original story, so I’m not sure if it’s just her publisher forcing her to write it because it’ll sell or if she actually has something else to say.

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